The Can-Do Candida Diet: Blueberry Muffins for the Candida Diet
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Monday, August 19, 2013

Blueberry Muffins for the Candida Diet


Blueberries always call to mind my childhood summers spent in a small Maine town on the island of Mount Dessert.  There, fresh blueberries grow small and tart on bushes beside hiking trails and lining the backyards. The telltale purple stain of their juice colors my memories.  It sits on my mind like a birthmark on skin, permanent and so very personal.

Aside from eating them by the fresh-picked handful, warm from the sun, my favorite application for blueberries is that Downeast staple, the blueberry muffin.  I just can’t come to Maine without getting a craving for them, so this recipe is my Can-Do Candida answer to the muffins I grew up with.

Candida Diet Blueberry Muffins

These candida diet blueberry muffins have a nostalgic taste.  Coconut flour gives these breakfast pastries a doughy consistency and slight biscuit flavor.  Hints of cinnamon and stevia take this muffin to delicious heights of sweetness for a muffin that is classic and comforting.

Candida Alert: Even though fruit sugars are naturally occurring and come hand in hand with healthy fiber and nutrients, the body still registers them as sugar.  In general, fruit intake should be limited on the candida diet, as even fruit sugar can cause blood sugar fluctuations and feed yeast when the quantities are too excessive. Berries are a good answer to this problem, as they are typically low-sugar fruits, so you can have larger servings with fewer consequences.

These muffins are packed with organic wild Maine blueberries; this variety is tart, tasty, and perfect for baking.  I used fresh blueberries because I had them readily available, but you can use frozen if need be.

Ingredients:

1 cup almond flour
1 cup coconut flour
1 tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp salt
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp cream of tartar
1 tbsp chia seeds
2 eggs
1 cup milk
¾ tsp liquid stevia
1 tsp vanilla
10 tbsp (1 ¼ sticks) salted butter, melted
2 tbsp plain unsweetened Greek yogurt
½ tsp lemon juice
1 ½ cups fresh Maine blueberries

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, cinnamon, salt, baking soda, cream of tartar, and chia seeds. Stir the dry ingredients to thoroughly combine them.

In a medium-sized bowl, beat two eggs. To the eggs, add milk, stevia, vanilla, melted butter, Greek yogurt, and lemon juice. Whisk these ingredients to combine.  If necessary, use a rubber spatula to cream the yogurt into the mixture to break up any large lumps.  Small lumps will work themselves into the batter once the wet and dry are combined.

Once the wet ingredients are well integrated, add the blueberries into the bowl.  Then pour the entire contents of the medium-sized bowl into the large bowl of dry ingredients.  Use a folding motion to stir the wet into the dry, being careful not to crush the blueberries.

Once the batter comes together into a thick and sticky mixture, use your hands to transfer it into a muffin tray already lined with parchment baking cups.  Fill the cup with batter and pat it to ensure that there is no empty space at the bottom as the batter will not spread during baking. If you would like your muffin to have a rounded top, add a pinch of extra batter to form a mound at the top of the muffin (the batter does not rise).

For regular-sized muffins bake for 40-45 minutes, rotating the pan at the halfway mark. For mini muffins bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating the pan at the halfway mark. The muffins are done when the tops appear golden brown and toasted. 

Allow the muffins to cool before removing them from the pans.

Try these muffins hot out of the oven, or toasted with butter.  To store, place the muffins in an airtight container in the fridge or freezer and enjoy as desired.
   


17 comments:

  1. What a nice treat! Do you know what the amount of stevia would be if I used the powder form?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Distant Dreamer,

      When using powdered stevia I use about a quarter to one half as much as if I were using the liquid. This is because the powdered form tends to have a more concentrated sweetness.

      However, this value could vary depending on the brand of stevia you choose, as well as personal preference. The failsafe answer is to start small and taste as you go, ensuring that you get the right level of sweetness for you.

      Best of luck and thanks for visiting!

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  2. Hi. This looks delicous, but I just wanted to ask you about the cream of tartar. Is there anything else I can use as a substitute? Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Anonymous,

      The cream of tartar serves as an acid to react with the baking soda in order to produce a leavening effect (the chemical reaction that makes baked goods “fluffy”).

      If you don’t have cream of tartar, you can supplement with another acid, bearing in mind that whichever one you choose may impact the flavor of the recipe. For this recipe, I would recommend increasing the fresh lemon juice to 1 tsp. That should get you near the equivalent of the missing tartar, and the flavor should still work nicely with the blueberries.

      Enjoy!

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  3. Hi, I was just wondering if I could get away with only using Coconut flour as I hate Almonds with the fire of a thousand suns! I do really need something sweeter though, Im missing my puddings!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Anonymous,

      I’m not sure how the muffin would hold up structurally with only coconut flour. When I have used coconut flour alone in recipes the products tend to go either more towards the dry and crumbly side, or can be wetter and almost custard-like if you try and balance the dryness with more moisture in the recipe.

      What I would recommend, if you have more of an almond aversion than a nut allergy, is to try baking these with hazelnut flour. Hazelnut flour has a slight nutty flavor, but it is distinct from almond. However, because it is so similar in texture, when it is finely ground hazelnut flour can replace almond flour cup for cup in most recipes without changing a thing. Let me know what you decide!

      Best of luck!
      Can-Do Candida

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  4. Do you know what the nutrition information on these muffins are?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Anonymous,

      The reasons why I do not know or post the exact nutritional information for these muffins have to do with my personal philosophy about food.

      When I started the candida diet, I always felt denied. I couldn’t eat this, I couldn’t eat that - it seemed like everything delicious was off the table (quite literally). When I began to bake for myself again, and to develop the recipes that I share here on this blog, it was freedom. These recipes were my way back to enjoying my food again.

      I understand that people make individual choices and that not all of my readers are on the candida diet, or even the same incarnation of the diet as I am. I make a personal choice not to count calories because to me, those numbers suggest that I should feel bad about eating something based on percentages alone, and it is my opinion (which, I just want to state out of respect for other lifestyles, no one else needs to share) that food is a part of a bigger, more holistic lifestyle. I give my body what it needs and I take care of it, but I also allow myself the enjoyment of food (as I’m sure you’ve noticed from my affinity for butter).

      What I can offer you is that there are websites online that can calculate nutritional information based on a recipe, and if any information that you need for that calculation is not stated on my blog, I am happy to answer personal emails with further information so that you can fill in the gaps for what you need.

      Please, never hesitate to send an email if you have questions, and I wish you the best in your search for health and happiness.

      Best,
      Can-Do Candida

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  5. how can I cut out some of the butter in this recipe?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Anonymous,

      If you’d like to substitute some of the butter, you can try replacing it with Coconut oil. This is a common switch made in a lot of vegan products.

      I have not personally tried this recipe with coconut oil, but from my understanding the ratio for substitution between the two is 1:1. I would however advise that you be aware of the fact that while coconut oil is a plant product, it is also still a saturated fat. This means it is solid at cold or room temperatures, but it does have a lower melting point than butter. In the case of this recipe, that shouldn’t present a problem because my instructions call for melted butter.

      I hope your substitutions work out, and please do comment with your results as I’m sure others (myself included) would be interested in how that switch affects the recipe!

      Best,
      Can-Do Candida

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  6. Hello there!

    How many muffins does this recipe make?

    Many thanks!

    Maria

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  7. HEY COULD I USE ALMOND MILK

    THANKS

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  8. I thought fruit and berries were not allowed on a Candida diet?

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    Replies
    1. They aren't, the information on this website will make your candida flourish. Do not use these recipes.

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  9. I am confused on the Milk, being on the candida diet it says to stay away from dairy. Is it different when using it in baking? I tried using Almond milk but it is more watery do you think this would make a difference in the recipe?

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    Replies
    1. No it is not different when using it in baking. Do not use this website. Most of the information on here is incorrect. If you need help please feel free to reply with an email and I can provide you with some recipes or direction to go to find desserts that are in fact candida friendly.

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