The Can-Do Candida Diet: February 2015
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Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Candida Diet Bread: Starting Again from Scratch



I want to say a thank you for all of those who have continued to visit this blog during my absence. 

Sometimes you lose something in your life and you think: That’s it. 
This is really it, this time.  Things simply cannot go on. 

With this great space in your life – constantly reminding you of its presence each time the wind blows though it and chills your bones, the tender parts of you that are now exposed, try as you might to conceal them again – it sometimes feels that you have even lost who you were before this happened. 

When these things happen, there is darkness.  There is darkness that may, at times, seem interminable. 
But the bright side of darkness is that there is a way out. 

Sometimes it just takes time, and faith that the storm can be weathered. 
And when you’re ready, there will come a day when you rise and get yourself out of bed, and head to the kitchen. 
And there in the kitchen, there are cabinets.  There are the tall cabinets above the counter that, as a child in your parents’ house, you had to climb a precariously balanced chair to reach, to reach those cabinets in which your mother hid the Oreos in order to parcel them out only after you’d finished your peas. 
Now, you can reach these cabinets. 
Now, you can open them and survey comfortably, all that is available to you. 
You have options: options for being productive, for creating something new out of scrap leftover from planned recipes that failed or succeeded while they lasted. 
You can feed yourself.  You can take care of yourself, now.  There is hope in that.  There is hope in assembling ingredients in a bowl, in taking the scattered elements of your thoughts and your ideas and in making them into something complete again. 

This recipe is simple, but it has become a staple in my kitchen. 
This is an improvement on an earlier toasting bread recipe I posted over a year ago.  Since then, I have learned a great deal, and not just about baking.  The medley of flours and the addition of the quinoa flakes means that this bread has less of the moist, eggy-ness that makes it, well, less convincing as bread. 
It feels more savory, and satisfies as such. 


Try it hot out of the oven with butter, or toast it up for a tuna melt.  This recipe is so easy you can commit it to memory.  And, if you’re like me, you will find yourself baking on a bi-weekly basis (as a bonus, it makes your apartment smell amazing). 


Ingredients:

1 cup Almond flour
1 cup Flax seed meal
1 tbsp. Whole chia seeds
¼ cup Quinoa Flakes (I used Ancient Grains brand)
3 tbsp. Garbanzo flour
1 tsp. Salt
¼ tsp. Baking soda
¼ tsp. Cream tartar
1 cup Egg whites
½ cup Almond milk, original unsweetened
1 tsp. Olive oil

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients (almond flour, flax seed meal, chia seeds, quinoa flakes, garbanzo flour, salt, baking soda, and cream of tartar). 
Stir to combine. 

Once the ingredients are evenly mixed, add the wet ingredients to the bowl (egg whites, almond milk, and olive oil).  Stir to thoroughly combine. 

Line a 9-inch loaf pan with parchment paper to prevent sticking.
Pour the bread batter into the pan and give it a gentle shake to evenly distribute it and smooth the surface.

Bake the bread at 375 degrees for 45-50 minutes, or until the top of the loaf is toasted golden brown.

Once baked, remove the bread from the oven and allow it to cool for at least half an hour before removing it from the pan and slicing. 

Keep the bread in an airtight container and store it in the fridge for up to two weeks, or slice and freeze it in airtight plastic bags to defrost perfect portions as you need them.


Enjoy!